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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 18, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's monday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. this morning, the live transportation of an is from the uk and across europe, and exclusive investigation for this programme has fun shopping and illegal practices. journey times are very often exceeded and also the loading density, often to many animals on board, very often they are transported in temperatures above 35 degrees, even though this would be forbidden or is forbidden by eu legislation. we'll bring you that full report in about 15 minutes. as police continue to question them about the parsons green cube attack, describe —— survivors describe their ordeal. there was a one-off fire, my instinct was just to run. three properties are being searched including the address of elderly foster carers — we'll talk to friends of those carers. as critics continue to say london
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fashion week is an diverse and of, we gathered together or own panel to debate it. —— is not diverse enough. hello... welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. throughout the morning we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories — wayne rooney is due in court in the next hour charged with drink driving — we'll bring you the details plus we'll tell you who won what at the emmys. as always keen to hear from you on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a ta keaway attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway in hounslow, a second suspect arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody, and even more reports. —— andy murray. late on saturday night, a second man is arrested in the centre of hounslow in connection with the tube bombing. this is no ordinary detention.
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at least three forensic officers check the man over for any evidence, before he is taken away. he is 21 years old, and believed to be a syrian refugee. he used to live in sunbury, alongside the first man detained at dover. the suspect was arrested just before midnight on saturday, outside these shutters. for several hours yesterday, police were carrying out an investigation and a search of this chicken shop next door. a number of detectives left late last night, carrying several items in bags for further examination, including what seemed to be a television or computer monitor. the connection between this middle eastern chicken shop and the arrested man is unclear. but he is believed to have lived at this location, in nearby stanwell, very close to the perimeter of heathrow airport. neighbours described him as a quiet man who never caused any trouble. the focus of the most intensive police search is sunbury, where an 18—year—old refugee, thought to be from iraq, shared a home with his elderly foster pa rents.
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these cctv images obtained by itv news show a young man leaving the back of that house very early on friday morning, with a distinctive lidl carrier bag. 90 minutes later, a bucket bomb inside a very similar bag went up in flames on the floor of a tube train at parsons green. the police investigation is by no means over, but the reduction in the terror threat level means that the authorities believe there is no longer an imminent risk of another attack. andy moore, bbc news matthew thompson is in sunbury—on—thames. as the report said, clearly an ongoing investigation? absolutely, you can see in the lilac coloured
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house, an intensive investigation taking place, the residents of the foster couple, and we believe residents, connected to the 18—year—old investigated. you can see forensics tends, another forensics tend in the back garden, very much an ongoing forensics operation happening here, you... a little more about the people who lived here, the 18—year—old arrested in saturday morning on —— at dover, believed to be a syrian refugees who once lived that this house, a 21—year—old syrian refugee named, also believed at some stage to have lived here. arrested in hounslow last night near a chicken shop that the report mentioned although he lived at a residence in stanlow, both those properties have been subject to police searchers, nothing like the intensity we are seeing
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behind me here and that couple with clues of cctv footage gives you an idea that perhaps the least think this is the house in which the bomb was actually made and prepared. —— sta nwell. was actually made and prepared. —— stanwell. matthew, thank you. more on that throughout the programme but first, here is a summary of the rest of the news. here is anita mcveigh. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting in an article that the uk stood to regain 350—million pounds a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the "wilful distortion" of his article and asked him "to withdraw it." an investigation for this programme has found that animal welfare is being neglected on long journeys across europe amid a booming livestock trade. it's been discovered livestock hauliers have been routinely breaking eu laws for the protection of animals in transit.
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animal rights groups are calling for a ban on journeys of more than eight hours. there's been a big increase in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. in 2014, 11 percent of cases featured material gathered by the groups — by last year that figure had risen to 44 per cent. jon cuthill has this report. the police say paedophile hunters are vigilantes. they pose as children online, film their meetings with people who groom them, and post their videos on social media. you've arranged to meet a 14—year—old boy here today, for sex? no. you have — do you want me to get the cellphone out and show you? the police are on their way. i'm a paedophile hunter, mate. that's what i do. you are under citizen's arrest. in 2014, 11% of cases for meeting a child following sexual grooming contained paedophile hunter evidence. two years later, that has grown to 44%. look, i think that's an embarrassing
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figure for british policing. look at the success that's being achieved. recognise, of course, the dangers of vigilante behaviour, but then do something about it. bring it within the criminaljustice system. will there ever be a situation where they could work together with police? i think it's something that we'll potentially have to look at. but it comes with complexity, not least of all the psychological screening that the professionals go through, to make sure that these people are still not being adversely affected by this. whilst i'm going to have to look at it, the risks are really significant, and cannot be understated. i will not condone these groups, and i would encourage them to stop. but i recognise that i'm not winning that conversation, and i'm not winning that moral argument. the man caught by this southampton—based hunter pleaded guilty, and is injail awaiting sentencing. you can watch more on this on ‘inside out' at half past 7 tonight on bbc one in the south of england, and it will be
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on the iplayer afterwards. for schoolboys have been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a man in leicester. it's in connection with the death of a man in his 60s he was fined injured on king street in leicester on saturday september the 2nd. he died later. 314—year—old boys and a 15—year—old had been arrested. police in the us state of georgia had shot and killed an lgbt student activist leading to an independent investigation. the lease encountered scout schultz at a campus in atlanta after calls about a person with a knife and a gun, officials said. footage has emerged apparently showing schultz, 21, refusing to obey multiple police commands to dropa obey multiple police commands to drop a knife. shall this parents said police should not have used lethal force. a used lethalforce. a third day
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used lethal force. a third day of protest has turned violent instantly following the acquittal of a wide former police officer accused of killing a man. individuals began throwing missiles at officers, several people have been arrested. wayne rooney is due in court later after being charged with drink—driving. he was arrested when police stopped a car in wilmslow in cheshire in the early hours of the 1st of september. the 31—year—old everton striker will appear before magistrates in stockport. thousands of passengers had been left stranded at new zealand's augustine airport after a pipeline leak caused a shortage ofjet fuel. dozens of flights from auckland have been cancelled, the pipeline bringing fuel to the airport was accidentally damaged by a digger on a farm. television's top awards, the emmys, have been handed out in los angeles. "veep" was named best comedy while "the handmaid's tale" took the top drama series. the series won a host of awards
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including best actress for elisabeth moss. there were a number of british winners, including charlie brooker for lack birth. victoria, back to you. —— black mirror. 0nto the subject of live transportation of animals, lynn says it's time this. . the animals are stressed, so much footage out there now to show how bad it is. blossom on facebook says animals should be transported post—slaughter, livestock only should be booed between cattle for and slaughterhouse. the way we treat creatures speaks wally is about our lack of humanity and brian has a similar sentiment, it is simply unacceptable that the law is being disregarded while animals suffer unbearably. as said into creatures
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we have a responsibility to protect which we are failing to do. as a nation of animal lovers existing legislation needs to be in force. penalties introduced, the practice of live transport should be curtailed. 0ur of live transport should be curtailed. our exclusive investigation coming up, stay tuned. if you are getting in touch, you are welcome. let's get some sport now with tim hague. tim, manchester united are back asjoint leaders of the premier league, on what was an unhappy return for one of their former players? it wasn't a happy visit back to old trafford for wayne rooney. he left over the summer to join everton, really struggling at the moment, losing 4—0 yesterday, third from bottom in the premier league. rooney got a great reception from the home fans. not surprising, given his 253 goals for united, this was a bad day at the office for everton. jose mourinho role's side took an early
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lead through an antonio valencia goal. romelu lukaku rounding off the scoring. he left everton over the summer scoring. he left everton over the summerfor £75 scoring. he left everton over the summer for £75 million. the scoring. he left everton over the summerfor £75 million. the man who sold ten, ronald koeman, under pressure but critical of those including jose mourinho who think his side should be aiming for at least a top four finish. every manager in life has doubts. there is no one who has no doubts in life in football as a manager. that's normal. of course i ask myself why, why? if there is anybody in this room and outside who sees something realistic what is possible for this everton please come. fair point. lewis hamilton is looking in control of the f1 drivers championship after his win in singapore yesterday? it could not have been a better race
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for him. he said he needed a merkel to win and that's exactly what he got with help from sebastian vettel. we will show you why in a second. hamilton came from fit on the grid to extend his lead to 28 points with six races of the season remaining, if that was a perfect day, the day for sebastian vettel was the opposite. 0n pole position, collided with kimi raikkonen and max verstappen at the first corner. all three were out of the race. felt like a defining moment in the championship, even more so given that hamilton cruised to victory looking good for a fourth world title at the moment. isn't he? andy murray has been championing the cause of women's sport again today tim? as always, his previous comments on gender equality drew a lot of interest and praise including when he famously corrected a journalist,
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casual sexism at wimbledon, you can see that on the bbc sport website. writing for the bbc he pointed out he never intentionally set out to be a spokesperson for women's equality but then he employed amelie mauresmo as his coach back in 2014 he said it could be came clear she wasn't a lwa ys could be came clear she wasn't always treated the same as men in similar jobs always treated the same as men in similarjobs so i felt i had to speak out about that. he also discusses the fact that male and female athletes in the same sacrifices and the penal tennis players are as determined as any man to get to the top of the game, judy murray has brought up a good lad, hasn't she? you can play a bit too. cheers tim, thank you. an investigation for this programme has found that animal welfare is being neglected on long journeys across europe amid a booming livestock trade. we found livestock hauliers routinely breaking eu laws for the protection of animals in transit. animal rights groups are calling for a ban on journeys of more than eight hours. 0ur reporterjon ironmonger has spent time on the turkish—bulgarian border, witnessing some of the conditions animals experience as they're
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transported out of the eu. his film contains some strong and upsetting images including those of dead animals. it lasts around 16 minutes. today, there is a growing global appetite for a controversial export, live animals. sheep, cattle and pigs in particular. and the uk, along with the rest of europe, is cashing in. but long journeys in stifling crowded lorries can take a toll on living cargo. do you think animals die every summer at the border? 100%. and we have seen evidence of widespread welfare issues. this is a
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big problem. it's cruelty to animals. campaigners are calling for animals. campaigners are calling for a ban, but lawmakers aren't convinced. the main issue is enforcement of law. the main issue is control. it's early morning near the port of ramsgate in kent and these local activists are waiting for the latest shipment of live stock. the port here is one of the main trade routes for animals leaving the uk. in late summer there are leaving the uk. in late summer there a re protests leaving the uk. in late summer there are protests and animal trucks every week. do you think it is correct that animals should travel thousands of miles merely to have their throats cut? these trucks belong to companies
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from the netherlands, ireland and northern ireland. 0n northern ireland. on board, there are more than 2,000 sheep from carlisle in cumbria. we don't like it. we don't want it to go on. we're sick and tired. it's cruelty to animals. we don't have to do this to eat meat. they will be slaughtered, more local and transported as meat. where are the trucks going? initially into france and belgium. belgium one would assume. from there on in, they could literally go anywhere. as far as turkey. it has been known. british sheep as far as turkey. the trade in live animals is growing. british cattle, sheep and pig exports have tripled in value over the past five yea rs tripled in value over the past five years and across europe, live stock shipments are a major lucrative industry. british and european exports of live cattle and sheep we re exports of live cattle and sheep were worth more than 4 billion euros last year. while live exports to non—eu countries have increased in
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value by 50% since 2012. exports of live stock from britain are controlled by eu laws which the uk is expected to adopt post brexit. but there is wide support for a ban. so what impact does long—distance transport really have on the welfare of animals? transport really have on the welfare ofanimals? i'm transport really have on the welfare of animals? i'm going to the edge of europe to find out. i'm going to bulgaria where every year hundreds of thousands of animals cross into turkey. animals potentially from as far as britain. well, it's a hot day in bulgaria. the sun is blazing. we're here with martin our driver and we're head to go the bulgarian border, but first, we're going to try and stop at a stable where many of the truck drivers off load their animals. this staging point isjust animals. this staging point isjust a couple of miles from the border. you can see all the animal trucks.
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some of the animals here have been travelling for more than 24 hours already and this is the last chance to rest them at a stables before they enter turkey. this is gayle. can we do a little bit of filming? no, it's not possible. can we walk around? no. i understood that. this staging point is closely guarded and we weren't allowed to see the animals. can you ask your colleague to not make any videos. but we didn't have to wait long. at the border there are dozens of transporters stuck in queues that stretch for miles. temperatures today are pushing 40 celsius and this seems to be showing. the bull lying down in this truck is hyperventilating heavily. how far
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have you come? where have you come from? from germany, from spain? bulgaria? slovakia. have you seen many other trucks like this. this many other trucks like this. this man has travelled nearly 1,000 miles to get here, but tells me he rested his animals at a stables last night. most of the drivers are bemused by oui’ most of the drivers are bemused by our concern. animals are a commodity to them. animal welfare, an inconvenience. after all, why protect a life that's been earmarked for slaughter? some of these trucks have been travelling for 24 hours, maybe one or two thousand miles from germany, spain, and even the uk potentially. and when they get to the border, there is anotherfour hour wait at the very least before they're processed hour wait at the very least before they‘ re processed and hour wait at the very least before they're processed and then can continue on theirjourney into turkey, the middle east, and beyond. laws for the protection of animals during transport act on all exports
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from europe and the uk. even those to third countries. journeys should be as short as possible and under taken without delay. detailed travel plans should be provided. animals must be fit to travel and vehicles should meet welfare standards with sufficient floor height and space. it's thought the government will adopt similar, if not tougher laws, when britain leaves the eu. i have a meeting at the border with an independent investigator, arranged by cam passion in world farming which has campaigned. christine keeps a check on live stock passing into turkey and she and her colleague have agreed to share some of their footage with us. we do find infringements in many trucks, but one point for sure that the journey times are very often exceeded and also the loading density, there are often too many animals on board. very often they are transported at
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temperatures above 35 degrees even though this would be forbidden or is forbidden by eu legislation. for example yesterday, we followed a truck with sheep that were transported on four decks. so, they really couldn't stand in a normal position and they were with their heads and with their backs touching the ceiling so there was no way any ventilation could go through. there we re ventilation could go through. there were 500 sheep. so, of course, if you are forced to stay for many, many hours, if not days on a truck, at 35 or more degrees and there is no ventilation going through, this is, of course... it is an oven. yeah, exactly, it is an oven. and sheepin yeah, exactly, it is an oven. and sheep in general they are transported worse. i always think because their monetary worth is lower. so they don't mind if a few sheep die? yeah. do you think animals die every summer at the border? this is for sure. next
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morning, we're heading into turkey. more transporters are queuing at the border. bulls from the czech republic. this one has an eye condition, aggravated by the heat and transit. a mile into turkey, we stop at a garage, full of transporters. these cattle ever parked in direct sunshine, but there is no water in the drinkers. christine and her colleague tell me the driver of this truck travelled for more than 30 hours to get here and that he admitted freely to breaking the law by stopping for a long sleep en route. they are very often stopping at this gas station. when we ask them what they do, they always say waiting for papers. sometimes, it goes quick, just an hour or two, but sometimes this can last very long. but there is a stables at the back of this garage? yes. so why, why
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isn't this driver off loading these animals? well, most probably we can ask him. i would be curious what he says. he would most probably say it is not necessary, but it is not necessary because nobody is checking. nobody is checking whether the journey times and the rest periods are applied as soon as the animals enter turkey. periods are applied as soon as the animals enter turkeylj periods are applied as soon as the animals enter turkey. i ask around about what is causing the delays? not even this customs officer can give mea not even this customs officer can give me a clear answer, but what is clear is that the turkish state is taking a clean interest in these imports, imposing its own taxes and red tape. apparently deals are done here too. and there are more hold—ups while buyers haggle over prices. they have to wait here for many hours. sometimes a day and for animal welfare they should unload them. it is very hot. for this reason, they should unload them. actually, the law says if after two
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hours of delay the problem is not resolved, the animals need to be accommodated off the truck. but this simply never happens. you don't have to spend long at this garage to find animals in pain or distress. this heffer has severe breathing problems. it is possible she won't survive for much longer. 0n problems. it is possible she won't survive for much longer. on another lorry, this bull appears exhausted, trodden on and beaten. he should stand instinctively. finally, he climbs to his feet. the day after we left turkey, christine's colleague filmed this dead bull. she found it on the top deck of a transporter here. christine checks the journey logs of each transporter. she shows me that where we are is routinely recorded as the place of destination. but in reality, the animals begin new journeys
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destination. but in reality, the animals begin newjourneys here, arranged ad hoc to slaughter houses hundreds of miles away in ankara, istanbul. by law they should be off loaded for 24 hours before travelling to a new destination, but that doesn't happen. there are lorries carrying heffers and bulls waiting to get clearance, eu laws should remain in effect, but the end of the road for these animals is unserngs unchecked and can be brutal. slaughter houses in turkey and the middle east are unregulated. recent investigations have exposed inhumane treatment and methods that are banned in europe. we're returning to bulgaria. at the border we spot a truck with sheep packed overfour we spot a truck with sheep packed over four floors. we saw it ten hours ago when we first crossed into turkey. the following night, nearly
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30 hours later, we discover it will still hasn't moved. so it is 11 o'clock now on sunday night. ijust had a call from christine the investigator who is between the turkish and bulgaria border. she is with two trucks full of sheep. they have been standing there for three days now and the manager of the shipping company has come down, apparently, he is said to be desperate. so we're going to head down there now and see if we can talk to him. the manager of the trucks wants to return the sheep to bulgaria, but first he needs permission from the border vet. hi, christine, it'sjohn. permission from the border vet. hi, christine, it's john. hi. where permission from the border vet. hi, christine, it'sjohn. hi. where are the sheep trucks now? are they coming back into bulgaria? how are the sheep now? 0h, they have been for three days in the heat in the back of the truck. and there is obviously a strong
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smell of dead animals. we approach the border on foot and head to an area near the first checkpoint, but must be very cautious to film here. when we meet the manager, he has been unable to break the deadlock and is worried about provoking the turkish customs. we have agreed not to show his face. this is a big problem. do you know what happened? do you know the reason... no. . no. i can't speak. i don't know. i don't know. what does the driver tell you? nothing. nothing? . he doesn't know nothing. usually-the trucks are stuck at the border, sooner or later they have to solve the problem, but it will be later, not sooner. have you seen it will be later, not sooner. have you seen something like this before? yes. the same system where for some reason the truck won't be allowed into turkey and so it sits here? yeah. like a bill of limbo land? yes and nobody knows where to go, not forward and not back. this is not the first time i have seen this.
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what do you think will happen? in the end? the animals will keep on dying. the following night, afterfourfull days without proper food and water, the sheep are finally allowed into turkey and off loaded. they appear frantic and ca ked turkey and off loaded. they appear frantic and caked in filth. at least one sheep is dead inside the truck. the bulgarian border authority told us the bulgarian border authority told us that this consignment met legal requirements and that the delay was the result of a decision taken by turkish customs. we contacted the romanian transport company, but they didn't respond. across europe, and especially, the uk, there is a call ona especially, the uk, there is a call on a change. in particular a ban on journeys more than eight hours.
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europe is divide over the issue of animal transport, weighing up the lucrative demand for exports with the concerns for animal welfare, so what if anything, can be done to find a balance? i have come to brussels to meet the man chiefly responsible. there are a number of laws acting for the protection of animals in transport, how well are those eu laws working, do you think? we have from my point of view, enough laws, someone ask us to provide laws, but the main issue is enforcement of the laws. the main issueis enforcement of the laws. the main issue is controlled, the main issue issue is controlled, the main issue is level and quality of official control, the main issue is education of all operators who are involved in live animal transportation. uk mps in the past have lamed europe for
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not being able to ban the long—distance transport of animals. but, if i may... it's a very complex issue because it's a lot of factors, it's not only one, not only hours. animal welfare standards must be respected, doesn't matter whether you are transporting eight hours, 11 hours or six. the uk government refused to be interviewed, told us it would look at options to limit journey times for animals after leaving europe although animal rights campaigners are sceptical. the transport of live and also has profound challenges, with policing, with animal suffering. but the trucks keep coming and the value of this trade keeps rising. no one from the animal livestock transportation industry would talk to us this morning to defend the practise, but later on we are speaking to
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representatives from the feed and sheep industry. and you can read more about it on the bbc news site: www. bbc. co. uk/news/world—europe—412 1570 the street from wayne, really pleased that you are highlighting this, i struggled to watch the film, it angered me. from linda, why don't we keep our live animals and the eu keeps theirs? why swap, the only people benefiting from this out the middlemen and truck drivers, why not keep costs low, transport emissions down and use our own stock? julian facebook, live exports for slaughter should be illegal, end, happens all over the world and the animals and your unbelievable distress and suffering. if animals are to be transported better control for their welfare. bank you for those, keep them coming in. we will talk more about that. still to come: a surprise appearance by president trump's former press secretary gets the biggest laugh at the emmys but it was the handmaid's tale that won
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the biggest plaudits on the night. this will be the largest audience to witness and emmys. .. this will be the largest audience to witness and emmys... period, both in person and around the world! it's day five of london fashion week — and already it seems to be pushing the bar on diversity — with one of the opening shows using models in wheelchairs and with prosthetic limbs — so is the fashion industry finally making the changes many have been calling on for years? we'll be speaking to four models for their thoughts. 9:33am. here is annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway in hounslow, a second suspect arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody. the incident injured 30 people.
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the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting in an article that the uk stood to regain 350—million pounds a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the "wilful distortion" of his article and asked him "to withdraw it." an investigation for this programme has found that animal welfare is being neglected on long journeys across europe amid a booming livestock trade. it's been discovered livestock hauliers have been routinely breaking eu laws for the protection of animals in transit. animal rights groups are calling for a ban on journeys of more than eight hours. there's been a big increase in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. the chief constable in charge of
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child abuse investigations across the uk has told the bbc he consider working with paedophile hunter groups in the future. the handmaid's tale has scooped a host of awards at the emmys. among the awards script was best actress for elizabeth moss. 0ther british winners included ruth ahmed and charlie brooker. wayne rooney has just arrived at court in stockport, he is facing charges of drink—driving, 0llie foster is there. yes, he arrived in the last couple of minutes of stock for magistrates, large media presence here, some manchester united, probably everton fans wishing him well. saying good luck. he was arrested and charged in the early hours of the 1st of september,
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2am, pulled over by cheshire police, driving a black box wagon beetle that belonged to the 29—year—old office worker laura simpson who was in the vehicle as well. followed a day spent at wilmslow, the southern pa rt day spent at wilmslow, the southern part of manchester. arrested and charged for being over the legally prescribed limit and he will appear in the next 30 minutes or so in court here at stockport magistrates. carries an unlimited fine and we will see what happens to wayne rooney. we do not know yet whether he will offer any mitigating circumstances or what his plea will be. certainly it carries a minimum 12 month driving ban and an unlimited fine, we wait to see what the magistrate has to say on the matter. cheers, olive. that was 0llie foster after 10am. some more m essa 9 es
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0llie foster after 10am. some more messages about the live transportation of animals from britain to europe, the shocking practices we have uncovered. lizzie says i am ashamed we allow this cruel and barbaric trade exporting live animals to countries with no welfare laws. louise says as a sheep farmer i know how stringent regulations regarding animal welfare, it's unacceptable these are not been enforced across europe, the us keen on telling farmers how to run theirfarms us keen on telling farmers how to run their farms but where are they on this? no far. linda says let's talk about the bigger picture, why is it necessary to swap livestock, let's keep livestock, we know what are eating, we must burning fuel increasing pollution, surely this raises the end price for the consumer. another correspondent, i cannot believe we're having this debate 20 years after we blockaded the ports to try to stop, total ban needed as soon possible. thank you. here's some sport now with tim hague
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manchester city enjoyed another impressive victory yesterday, beating everton 4—0, romelu lukaku scoring one of the goals. everton now third from bottom. lewis hamilton 28 points here with six races of the formula one season remaining, after sebastian vettel along with his ferrari team—mate kimi raikkonen crashed out after this spectacular first corner collision, allowing hamilton to cruise to victory from this place. there was a fairy tale at the 2017 champions league of darts in cardiff, 40—1 outsider mensur suljovic beat two—time world champion gary anderson 11—9. he ta kes champion gary anderson 11—9. he takes on the first prize of £100,000. that's it for now. thank you. police investigating friday's attack on the london underground are continuing to search three properties. two men, aged 18 and 21, remain in custody over the bomb
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blast at parsons green station. 16—year—old jack durston was caught up in it, he describes what it was like to be so close to the device. i wasjust listening to music, i had noise—cancelling headphones on, and i heard a scream so i took them off and i looked to my left and there was a big ball of fire, the whole width of the carriage, moving towards us very fast. so my instinct was to just run, and i ran away from the fire and out the door. my priority was just to get out of that train. so i got out to the platform and i sort of stood still for a second and ijust sort of... it just sort of clocked and ijust started crying. god, that was horrible. sirens. everybody start moving. sensibly, quietly, moving away. so what time train are you going to get tomorrow?
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7.41am. are you all set? have you got everything packed? yeah, i think so. i didn't want to sit down, because if i'd sat down, maybe i wouldn't have been able to run, and also i'd been very observant, looking for things. like, there was a coffee cup at guildford station — ijust went over and looked at it because, i don't know, even though it was just a coffee cup... i'm very lucky, and the fact that i escaped that narrowly, i'm really grateful. a total of three properties are being searched as part of the parsons green bomb investigation including a house in sunbury—on—thames in surrey, owned by elderly foster carers. ron and pennyjones — who won an mbe for fostering hundreds of children, including refugees. its believed the 18—year—old man who was arrested in the port of dover, was fostered by the joneses. alison griffiths is a local conservative councillor in surrey who has known ron and pennyjones for 3 years. we can also speak to mak chishty — who retired this summer as britain's most senior muslim police officer and was a met police commander for
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engagement during the london bridge and borough market attacks and simon kempton — the counter—terrorism lead for the police federation for england and wales. simon, first of all, this was a failed home—made device, how easy is to get instructions these things? good morning, must have been terrifying for people caught up in it. it is too easy, for easier than it. it is too easy, for easier than it should be. to be able to get your hands on instructions, normally online. actually some of the component parts, some things that go into making the bomb, are also in some cases quite easy to get hold of. it's illegal to download stuff like that but clearly people do? absolutely, lots of things are illegal and yet people still do them. what's been gratifying as a couple of months ago some of the
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largest tech companies in the world made a commitment to try and do more using their technology to try and divert people away from these sorts of sites. but i need to see more of that. let me bring in mac, the most singer muslim officer in the uk and ucb can be too politically correct about extremism, what you mean?|j think about extremism, what you mean?” think the uk is perfectly poised to lead the global agenda but having said that it requires an open discussion and sometimes it be about being politically incorrect straights bibles that debate. unless we have a really open discussion we will not be able to have an understanding that will lead us to getting upstream places where we need to be able to tackle extremism. what isn't being discussed that you think should be? there is a general lack of buttons, beer, about people being able to express themselves in freeway. what does that mean? are people want to talk about islam,
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they are fearful of offending islam and they are not dealing with issues. for instance, i said several times, terrorism masquerades as islam within muslim communities, that's not saying muslim communities are to blame, anything from that but that's what's happening and it violates people like me as a muslim, my religion and my beliefs and i think we should be able to talk about those things. alison you'd know penny and ronjones, tell our audience a little bit about them? penny and ron had been fostering children for the past 30 years, they've been absolutely amazing, they've been absolutely amazing, they never, ever turn a child away. in the community, we couldn't do without them, i wish more people we re without them, i wish more people were like them, that would actually give up theirtime were like them, that would actually give up their time and space are youngsters that are vulnerable and yes, they are such a great couple, they really are. have they always fostered refugee children or all children? i think lately it's been more more of the refugee thing, as
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farasi more more of the refugee thing, as faras i am more more of the refugee thing, as far as i am aware they have fostered eight and these children have come from algeria, afghanistan, iraq, all then sorts of places, so, yes, i don't think they look at them and see a muslim or anything like that, they look and see a vulnerable child and they want to do their best to help and i have to say the residents of sunbury have an amazing and penny and ron have got so much support for what they have done and we are all feeling... empathy, because it's just something you would never guess would happen. how do you think they will be coping with what's happened in the last few days? i think they are going to be very shocked, obviously upset. but they cannot let this affect the amazing work that they've done. you know, no one knows, it's very hard to spot these children that are being radicalised. i think from this, what i've took away is maybe we should provide training to carers and just have
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basic ways of identifying the children that come into foster care about are vulnerable as soon as any radicalisation on the internet or with their peers is taking place. simon, cani with their peers is taking place. simon, can i ask you about community policing. i know you say, everybody would agree, it's crucial, really important when it comes to terrorism, what do you say about it? i'm sure mark will agree with me. the uk's most senior police officer says community policing underpins the whole of that counter—terrorism effort. u nfortu nately, the whole of that counter—terrorism effort. unfortunately, though, that we have seen effort. unfortunately, though, that we have seen over effort. unfortunately, though, that we have seen over the last seven or eight years is community policing decimated across the uk. what you get is community police teams in name only because the officers that have been assigned to those teams spend their time plugging gaps elsewhere. there is a really interesting case from bristol, only a few years ago, where a chap called
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andrew plotted to explode a suicide vest in a shopping centre. the only reason that the police were able to stop that happening is from community intelligence from within the muslim community who stepped up because we get affected by this, muslims and non—muslims. the only reason the muslim community had done thatis reason the muslim community had done that is because the community bobby had built up confidence. we need to be able to give the public the service that they want, the service that they demand and need so. the government says the overall policing budget has been protected in real terms since 2015. thank you all of you. thank you for coming on the programme. pleasure has been on the fashion
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industry, the fact that there aren't enough plaque models and disability. this weekend one model claims she had been dropped from a london fashion week show because she was black. in a moment, we will speak to a disabled model, a muslim model, a 60—year—old model and a curvy model, but first here is everything you need to know about london fashion week which is under way at the moment. london fashion week takes place twice a year, once in february and again in september. 0verfive days hundreds of models appear on ca twa lks hundreds of models appear on catwalks across london to show case the work of more than 100 designers and they are watched by 5,000 fashion conscious visitors. behind the scenes the uk's fashion industry is huge business. it employs nearly one million people and accounts for 1.596 one million people and accounts for 1.5% of the money made in the uk, ourgdp, it 1.5% of the money made in the uk, our gdp, it contributes £28 billion directly to our economy. that's more than our legal services and
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broadcasting industries. the sector though brings with it a fair amount of criticism. designers are often criticised for choosing unweight or underage models to show off their clothes and for discriminating models against a certain race or those with disabilities, but could this be the most diverse fashion week to date? earlier this month some fashion houses made a commitment to use only models that are uka commitment to use only models that are uk a size six or bigger. and there has been a deliberate move by others to take on more models of different shapes, sizes, ages, eth necessities and disabilities. however, critics claim it is not happening fast enough and have accused the industry of making token gestures. and over the weekend, model nim onliy anderson claimed on twitter she was drpd from a fashion show because she is black. disabled models to work at london fashion week, salima boukayoua who's making her london fashion week debut
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this evening and alex bruni who is modelling at the age of 60. tell me what you think about the effo rts tell me what you think about the efforts of the fashion industry to be more representative on the catwalk? i believe that we have moved and we have gone in a better direction, but i still think there is more that can be done in regards to women of colour, black women, asian women, chinese women of all different body shapes and size on the catwalk as plus size brands have sizes that range from a 14 to a 26 ora 32, yet sizes that range from a 14 to a 26 or a 32, yet they stop at size 20 and women don't stop at a size 20. i believe the boundaries should be pushed and more women should be represented and fairly as well. ok. yes, ijust believe that women, women and men who are already
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marginalised in society, don't need to be further marginalised in the fashion industry. who is being marginalised? is fashion industry. who is being marginalised ? is it fashion industry. who is being marginalised? is it older women? is it black women? be specific.” marginalised? is it older women? is it black women? be specific. i think it black women? be specific. i think it is black women and older women and women with disabilities. transgender, people in society that don't fit the look... or societal norms. so it is notjust about, when you say they don't fit the look, we are not just you say they don't fit the look, we are notjust talking about perfect specimens, are we? you're talking about the colour of their skin? yes, just normal every day people are being turned down because they don't have this look which is weird because the fashion industry is targeted towards consumers and clients and customers and these are normal people. what do you say alex? yes, that's certainly the case. when you think about all the women and
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all the models and i have been modelling for some years, but it's only this year that i was asked to participate in within of the london fashion week shows. the one by joanna heinz on friday... alex, were you the only older model?” joanna heinz on friday... alex, were you the only older model? i was the only older model in that show, yes. it is kind of baby steps if you like, but it's not enough. the agency that represents me, there is not really that many requests for older models to be involved in fashion shows and that is. you can have older models in commercials and social advertising and things like insurance or stair lifts, but... not clothes! not clothes. god for bid because older women don't wear clothes. they walk around naked!
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kelly, what about you? do you feel like you are breaking down barriers in the fashion industry? oh yeah, definiteliment when i started modelling nine years ago, there weren't any models like me in working in the industry and to be modelling nine years and never to be asked to walk in london fashion week is shocking. so now is the time i feel for disabled models to say request this is who i am. i am beautiful. i am fashionable. i am worthy and i am able and i deserve to be represented because we all as women, all of us deserve to be represented no matter what our ages, our colour, ethnicity, you know, shape, size, ability, gender choice, whatever. we all deserve to be out there and be represented like for there and be represented like for the purple pound, it is the spending power of disabled people and it is £282 billion a year that the uk, high street are missing out on because they're not marketing to disabled people. it makes complete
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perfect business sense to market for those people. do you regard that as discrimination, the fact that you have not been asked to model at london fashion week? because i have an impairment, i am london fashion week? because i have an impairment, lam not london fashion week? because i have an impairment, i am not beautiful... has someone actually said that or expressed that? that's what it comes across as. that's what you feel is going on? instagram and the way society is, it's like you have to aspire to perfection and if you have aspire to perfection and if you have a disability, you're not seen as perfect because this is my imperfection. you mentioned instagram, clearly there are a lot of perfect images of men and women on instagram and there are loads of images of women who don't fit that conventional shape that you might see on a catwalk. these are people who are at home, normal people who are just going on their phones and starting up instagram accounts and putting their photos out there. it should be reflected in the modelling industry. we all wear clothes. we all need clothes and as customers we
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need to see that in the modelling industry. have you seen examples of discrimination? i have been signed with a diverse company. in my two weeks i haven't experienced discrimination yet. i have actually had loads of people say like they like my curly hair and they can work with it in photos and stuff. would curly hair sometimes be a problem? maybe. i think it is a chance to push people with different hair textures in. it can be. i have short hair. my hair is blond and i choose to have short hair because i like it and it's who i am, it defines my character and who i am. i went for ane character and who i am. i went for an e commercial and they said you need to buy a wig because we can see your hair. this is my hair and if your hair. this is my hair and if you would like me to model for you, you would like me to model for you, you have to take me as who i am.”
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wanted to say, i have a look that is regarded as weird because my hair is... grey... grey and long. your hair is beautiful. it is a little bit different. people would expect an older model to have shorter hair, not this wild main that i have. we talked about perfection and beauty ideas, but we really must remember that ideas of beauty do change. they're not fixed. they do change over time they're not fixed. they do change overtime and they're not fixed. they do change over time and they can tb changed. so, there isn'tjust one beauty idea that we should sort of think is the one we should aspire to because it's not the case just like you have different ways of making art, you also have different ways of being beautiful. but i'm not sure designers or brands
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are necessarily, some are, we can all name them, but broadly speaking they still have that image that we all know, because we see it on the front of high fashion magazines every day, they still have that image as the image of perfection, don't they? yes and no. i think there is also this misconception that clothes, in order to be properly show cased should be hanging on a particular body type, but in fact, when you look at models on the runway, you don't really see the details of the clothes, but you see people wearing clothes, but you see people wearing clothes and walking by. if you really wa nt clothes and walking by. if you really want to look at the details of the clothes they're wearing, you need to be close up and you need to be able to feel the fabric and so on. so the clothes that we're wearing, they are really connected with our bodies. the bodies wear the clothes and bodies are very different. let me ask you. it has been seen as a kind of progress that
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some designers at london fashion week are saying we are only now going to use models who are a size six and above. size six? i mean that's tiny, but... it is seen as progress, but one thing that seems to never change in the fashion industry is the hype. i mean, you are always expected to be a certain height. when it comes to any modelling agency, if you are not at least five eight... or five nine. it is like why are you considering modelling? i'm five seven. i'm making my debut at fashion week and i'm quite nervous, but it will be loads of fun, but i don't want to be the shortest girl there which is weird because everyone says i'm tall. and that's tonight. that's at 7pm. any advice? i'm sure you will do it extremely well. take it in your stride. the idea of the height again, it is another misconception because there have been very, very famous models who were not five eight. kate moss. actually petite
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women do need to be represented because you can't have just one size that fits all. i mean you really have to see how the clothes fall on a smaller body. this e-mail from audrey, "it is great to see diversity of models. this is all women we relate to. you are all beautiful, bravo." women we relate to. you are all beautiful, bravo. " thank women we relate to. you are all beautiful, bravo." thank you for coming on the programme and good luck tonight. nice to meet you all. the latest news and sport in a moment. before that, here is the weather. here is carol. we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. some of us have seen a fair bit of cloud and others have got off to a sunny start. there is a fair bit of cloud around, but as we move further south into hampshire, we have got blue skies and pleasant. we have got low pressure to the east of us and we've got high pressure to the west. the high pressure is effectively killing
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off the showers that. some of the showers across east anglia could be heavy and thundery and down this east coast, there is a chilly breeze as well. at the same time, we've got rain across the far north—east of scotland. that will fringe southwards as we go through the day getting in towards newcastle and hull. 0ut towards the west, more especially northern ireland you have got a better chance of staying dry. here, there will be fewer showers. a few showers in the southern uplands. a lot of dry weather in the central lowla nds a lot of dry weather in the central lowlands and highlands, but you can see we have that rain coming in across the far north—east into aberdeenshire and heading in the direction of newcastle as well. one or two showers across northern england, but many of us missing them. across central and eastern and south—eastern parts of england, it is where we will see more showers today. some of those will be heavy and thundery particularly in east anglia. terroristing towards the south—west, we are not immune to showers, but not all of us will
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catch one. it is the same for wales with cop temperatures getting up to 16 celsius. through this evening and overnight, a band of rain will continue to sink southwards, getting into southern counties by around dawn. behind tthere will be a few coastal showers, but under clear skies, it will abchilly night. in towns and cities, you can expect temperatures between seven and ten celsius, but in the countryside, rather like this morning, much colder, but you could see a touch of grass frost for example in some sheltered glens. tomorrow, we've got this ridge of high pressure ensconced across the uk. things settled. another weather front is coming in from the west later on. it will introduce thicker cloud and rain and strengthening winds, but before that happens, a lot of dry weather. a pleasant day with a fair bit of sunshine. you could seize out the odd shower, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. in light winds, temperatures up to 18 or19 light winds, temperatures up to 18 or 19 celsius. it will feel nice. but don't forget, later in the day, the cloud thickens across northern ireland and we start to see the
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arrival of rain and strengthening winds and here it is on wednesday. in the west, very slowly drifting eastwards, so the further south and eastwards, so the further south and east that you are, the drier and warmer it's likely to be. a tough atough and a tough and cucumber good morning. —— carol, thank you, good morning. hello, it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. live animals transported across from britain across europe — our exclusive investigation uncovers shocking and illegal practices. and another lorry, this bowl has been trodden on and refuses to stand up. we'll be showing the findings of our investigation to beef & sheep farmers here in the uk. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it's a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody in relation to the incident, which injured 30 people. there was a ball of fire the whole
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length of the carriage, my priority was to get out of that train. a surprise appearance by president trump's former press secretary gets the biggest laugh at the emmys. but it was the handmaid's tale that won the biggest plaudits on the night. i promise you, that did get the biggest laugh, we will bring you more on that later. good morning, here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it's a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody in relation to the incident, which injured 30 people. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting in an article that the uk stood to regain £350 million a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the "wilful distortion" of his article and asked him
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"to withdraw it." boris's father, stanley has told this programme he's standing by his son. i thought it was a first rate article and i thought it was absolutely right for a man who has, you know, been in the forefront of the brexit campaign including possibly the man who helped push written over into, you know, a vote to lead position, it was absolutely right he should keep that flame bright and clear before the bill's eyes and ears. you can see bright and clear before the bill's eyes and ears. you can see more bright and clear before the bill's eyes and ears. you can see more of that interview with boris johnson's father in about 30 minutes time. an investigation for this programme has found that animal welfare is being neglected on long journeys across europe amid a booming livestock trade. it's been discovered livestock hauliers have been routinely breaking eu laws for the protection
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of animals in transit. animal rights groups are calling for a ban on journeys of more than eight hours. the footballer wayne rooney is in court this morning, after being charged with drink—driving. he was arrested when police stopped a car in wilmslow in cheshire in the early hours of the first of september. the 31—year—old everton striker will appear before magistrates in stockport. the handmaid's tale has scooped three of the major prizes at this year's emmy awards. the drama, won best drama series, best director and best actress for elisabeth moss. riz ahmed was among the british winners, taking home best lead actor in the crime drama "the night of." 0ther british winners include charlie brooker, who took the best writing award for ‘black mirror‘ that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. your comments on film into the light transportation of animals across europe, has really uncovered some
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serious animal welfare conference, said thank you covering this, i agree it should be illegal, we need to start respecting animals, they don't deserve the way they are treated to keep us alive. charlotte said that this is being investigated, and hope this opens people's eyes to how cruel this is, rob says i am in tears thinking about those animals being carted off in terrible conditions to be slaughtered when they arrive. who has said this is ok, what right do we have us humans to allow this to happen? going to talk more about it in the next 30 minutes. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with tim hague. ronald koeman insists everton fans and the media need to get realistic about what the club can achieve this season after manchester united managerjose mourinho claimed they should be aiming for "at least" the top four. everton who included former united striker wayne rooney in their side, were beaten 4—0 at old trafford yesterday. antonio valencia opened the scoring, before three late goals including one from former everton striker romelu lukaku ended the contest.
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what a goal that was from valencia. united are nowjoint top of the table with manchester city. but it's now four straight defeats for everton, 12 goals conceded, and no goals scored. every manager in life has doubts, there is no one who has no doubts in life, in football, as a manager. my colleague talks about everton, spending 140 million, they need to go for the top four, sorry, if there is anybody in this room and outside who says something realistic rob is possible for this everton, please come. chelsea are now five points behind united, after being held to a 0—0 draw at home to arsenal. the away side had a goal disallowed for offiside.
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while chelsea defender david luiz was sent off for a high tackle late on in the game. we had a bad record recently here, a very strong record at home. i told the players to focus on the quality of our performance and the solidarity and that was very good, we know we didn't hide when we have the ball, we played, good to build on forfuture the ball, we played, good to build on for future games. there was good news for gareth bale last night. the welshman was booed by his own real madrid fans during a match on wednesday, but it didn't seem to bother him as he scored this spectacular goal in a 3—1win at real sociedad. bale's side are fourth in la liga at the moment. lewis hamilton took a big step towards a fourth world title yesterday, after coming from fifth place to win the singapore grand prix. it couldn't have been a better day for hamilton, as his championship rival sebastian vettel crashed out after a first corner collision, along with his ferrari team mate kimi raikkonnen and red
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bull's max verstrappen. it means that the briton has a lead of 28 points in the drivers‘ standings, withjust six races remaining. yesterday we struggled and we had no idea of what was going to happen today, we tried to stay focused, get ahead, very fortunate with the ferraris at the beginning, yes, couldn't be happier, really grateful. and the champions league of darts has a new winner, after 40—1 outsider mensur sullavic beat two time world champion gary anderson in the final. and while the austrian might have been the underdog all weekend, he won all five of his matches, and completed the fairytale by defeating anderson 11—9 in a really close final. it was the first major trophy of his career, no wonder he was so happy. some tears there as well, victoria. that is all the sport for no —— now,
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i will be backjust after half past. transporting animals while they are still alive, so they can be slaughtered or bred elsewhere, is a growing trade in europe. an investigation for this programme has found that the laws surrounding this practice are repeatedly being broken, meaning animals lives and welfare are being put at risk. exports of british cattle, sheep and pigs have tripled in value over the past five years, while europe is sending increasing numbers of animals to be slaughtered elsewhere. 0ur reporterjon ironmonger has spent time on the turkish—bulgarian border where animals are transported out of the eu — we bought you his full film earlier. here's a short extract — it contains some distressing images: europe is cashing in on a controversial export — live animals, for fattening and for slaughter. but there's fierce opposition to the trade, especially at the port of ramsgate in kent. these 2000 sheep have come from carlisle. where are these trucks going?
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initially into france and belgium, one would assume. from there on in, they could literally go anywhere. as far as turkey. the trade in live animals is growing. british cattle, sheep and pig exports have tripled in value over the past five years. and across europe, it's a major industry. eu exports of live cattle and sheep were worth more than 4 billion euros last year. while live exports to non—eu countries have increased in value by 50% since 2012. and many of those exports come here, to the bulgarian border. hundreds of thousands of animals pass through this checkpoint every year, destined for turkey and the middle east. in most cases, they've travelled long distances already, from countries all over europe. but delays here are commonplace. animals can stand for days on crowded lorries, and many will die in the heat before they get to the slaughterhouse. the transport of livestock is controlled by eu laws.
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but we found evidence of widespread infringements here, including exceeded journey times and overcrowded lorries. a mile into turkey, we stop at this garage full of transporters. most of the drivers are asleep. when we ask him what they actually do, they always say waiting for papers. sometimes it goes quick, but sometimes this can last also very long. actually, the law says if after two hours of delay the problem is not resolved, the animals need to be accommodated off the truck. but this simply never happens. you don't have to spend long here to find animals in pain or distress. this heiferfrom lithuania has severe breathing problems, and she might not survive for much longer. on another lorry, this bull seems exhausted. trodden on and beaten, still he refuses to stand up. there is wide public support for a ban onjourney times of more than eight hours.
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but lawmakers in europe are defiant. from my point of view, we've had enough of laws. the main issue is enforcement of laws. the main issue is control. the main issue is education of all operators who are involved in live animal transportation. the uk government said it would look at all options when britain leaves europe, but, for now, the trucks keep coming and the value of this trade keeps rising. jon ironmonger, bbc news, at the bulgarian border. no one from the animal livestock transportation industry would talk to us this morning to defend the practise — but we can speak to phil stocker, the chair of the national sheep association and duff burrell — a beef farmer who used to export cattle to romania and bulgaria. also with us — emma slawinski — the director of the charity compassion in world farming.
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welcome, all of you. emma, what did you make of this? shocking scenes but not surprising, horrible infringements of legislation when it comes to animal transportation, you cannot transport an animalfora transportation, you cannot transport an animal for a very long transportation, you cannot transport an animalfor a very long distance without having an impact on its welfare, we see dehydration, over crowding, heat stress, all of these issues, offer and over again and the law as it stands is completely flouted and even when it's not flouted and even when it's not flouted it allows journeys that are just simply too long. this is the 21st—century, we should not be exporting animals halfway across europe, outside of europe and beyond that to who knows where for slaughter in unimaginable conditions? phil, the representative of the national sheep association, what do you think of some of the illegal practice is clearly going on? first of all you cannot condone
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poor animal welfare, i am on? first of all you cannot condone pooranimalwelfare, lam not on? first of all you cannot condone poor animal welfare, i am not going to support the animal welfare seems that we have seen on that video clip but as she pointed out in that clip, most of the problems occur when regulations have been flouted, it's something we have called for a long time, proper compliance with regulations as animals travel across europe. who is responsible, doosra sponsor ability is to insure compliance, is it a year in forces, but hauliers, is at the farmers, offer does it begin? the responsibility for enforcement comes down on the regulatory authorities, the country through which those animals are passing. and again, it's animals are passing. and again, it's an absence of checks and compliance with the regulations and we are not seeing a level of compliance that we would see here in the uk. we saw in the film the image of the dead sheep covered in maggots, it is very, very
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distressing to see it, we are going to show it again now, if you don't wa nt to to show it again now, if you don't want to see it, to look away, that is totally u na cce pta ble, want to see it, to look away, that is totally unacceptable, is it not? i would agree, it's unacceptable for animal welfare, no one wants to see it, no one is attaining any value other than animal that arise at a destination point in that condition so destination point in that condition so it's not in any one's benefit and it would not happen if these operators were complying with the regulations that are clearly set out. why do we need any live transportation of animals? it is a legal trade... transportation of animals? it is a legal trade. .. of course it is. transportation of animals? it is a legaltrade... of course it is. but why do we need it? people choose to buy animals and they ship them across for feeding people in other countries. i would also argue that we need that trade because we also see the importation of meat products into this country. we would in
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general be fairly balanced in terms of sheep production and sheep consumption in this country, but we import huge volumes of lamb from other countries and to balance that we export sheep to balance that trade. are there enough welsh lambs to feed british people? i mean do we need new zealand lamb? again the argument for new zealand lamb is to balance seasonality. 0ur sheep are run within a very natural system where the majority of them are born in the spring and because of that you get the peaks and troughs of supply on to the market place so the argument for new zealand lamb coming in has been it balances that seasonality throughout the year, but if there were to be greater controls and this is something we have to be careful about around brexit, if we we re careful about around brexit, if we were to reduce the importation of sheep meat, lamb, from new zealand, then the industry, i believe, could adjust and adapt to be far more self—sufficient here in the uk. that's interesting. let me bring in
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duff. you used to ship your cattle to romania and bulgaria. what was it like in those wagons for them? good morning, victoria. yes, i still trade into europe. the wagons that we use here or cross into europe are extremely good. firstly on the cattle front from the uk, the only cattle front from the uk, the only cattle that we ship across the channel there is only one carrier who will take them and they will only take breeding and they are certified as breeding cattle by an independent authority before they will take the booking to move those cattle. so those animals are moving from breeding, not for fattening and slaughter. for cam iners who -- for cam “— slaughter. for cam iners who -- for cam —— for campaigners, it doesn't matter if it is breeding or to eat? there is a difference. breeding animals tend to be incredibly valuable and so they are transported ina way valuable and so they are transported
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in a way that's very different to animals that are going for fattening or slaughter, but i would disagree with the point about cattle going out of the uk. maybe across dover, i can see that point, but last year 3,000 unweaned calves went from scotla nd 3,000 unweaned calves went from scotland to spain. unweaned calfs. they are a couple of weeks old. their immune systems are not capable of that journey. scotland their immune systems are not capable of thatjourney. scotland to spain, what on earth are we doing? this is a ridiculous way to be treating animals. i don't think anybody in the great british public wants this to continue and we have a unext opportunity with brexit to take a stand and say we don't want this in britain. we value british farming and we value the high standards that we have here and we want this to be a message we send out to the rest of the world that this will not happen to british animals. you are saying it could be an opportunity for britain to bring in its own legislation which would ban journeys of what more than eight hours or ban journeys altogether? there is a few
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different options. to take an animal out of the uk and into france takes more than eight hours. an eight hour limit would end that trade. so we would like to see an eight hour limitand we would like to see an eight hour limit and we would like to see that across europe. what do you think about the idea of an eight hour limit? it would have a very poor economic impact on those that are sending breeding cattle across the channel and there is a demand and a need... this isn't about breeding animals. this is about animals going for slaughter orfor animals. this is about animals going for slaughter or for fattening and then slaughterment they are two separate issues and we shouldn't muddle them up. are you saying that breeding cattle can have a journey thatis breeding cattle can have a journey that is longer than eight hours? breeding cattle can have a journey that is longer than eight hours7m terms of not banning live exports from the uk, in a small number of cases, where breeding animals are incredibly valuable and transported in excellent conditions, completely
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different to the conditions these animals forfattening different to the conditions these animals for fattening and slaughter are going for. sorry, i did interrupt you. carry on. those calves that are being talked about there, the 200 would be one lorry load would have crossed the channel from the republic of ireland, would they not? there were 3,000 unweaned calves and they went from scotland to northern ireland to southern ireland and then across the sea and down into spain. that's a huge journey, but we have a real chance here, we've got a chance where for decades the british public have been saying they don't want this. the ferry companies for example won't allow those lorries on board because the british public don't like it. the government and farming institutions i have to say have been saying for years that they would like animals to be slaughtered as close as possible to where they're raised, but everyone has been saying we can't make this change because of european trade regulations, well, now we're coming out of the european union. we have an opportunity, the
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excuses have run out. would you support that? a ban onjourneys excuses have run out. would you support that? a ban on journeys of more than eight hours? no, i wouldn't actually. and i think if we saw a ban of eight hours on transport, it would lead to real problems for some of our live stock producers here in the uk. some of our journeys take producers here in the uk. some of ourjourneys take longer from scotland down to wales and we simply haven't got the slaughtering capacity or the food supply chains to support that length ofjourney time. i mean i think we need to be really clear about what we are trying to adhef here and publicly we hear a lot of people talk about banning exports and there is nothing wrong with exports and if we were to ban exports that would create additional problems with our irish borders for instance and again you couldn't argue there is anything wrong in term of welfare in exporting animals across land borders like that. you could then ask the question about whether it is wrong to take animals across water? i would argue that all the research
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that's been done has shown there is no problem taking animals across the water and if we were to ban animals going across the water then it would create problems for our islands, the scottish islands and the welsh islands and again the northern ireland and the mainland uk trade. so again the problem here is about a non compliance with regulation. we know that solicitor of the journey times from south—east england across to northern france and belgium can be less than eight hours injourney and with those routes are known about, they are watched, it is transparent i would argue there is nothing wrong with the welfare of animals being transported on that journey. thank you. all of you, thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you. a couple of comments. these are representative. this tweet from t, "live animal transportation is disgraceful and needs to stop now. no justification for it. animals suffer who are rend doesly." ed says, "i cannot watch the story of blatant cruelty for profit. i don't eat meat or dairy. i refuse to be
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pa rt eat meat or dairy. i refuse to be part of your hell." pam says, "the laws are there. the eu countries are simply not applying them." thank you. 50 times stronger than heroin and more deadly, fentanyl is the drug linked to the death of rock star prince, but what's the reality for those addicted? we meet users here in the uk. a cyclist who was convicted for hitting a woman as she crossed the road in london is due to be sentenced later today. charlie alliston, a 20—year—old former courier, has been told he faces a possible custodial sentence, but was cleared last month of the more serious charge of manslaughter. kim briggs the 44—year—old mother of two was killed. she was on her lunch break in february last year when she stepped out into old street and alliston collided with her at 18mph on his secondhand fixed—gear bike. the bike didn't have a front brake which is illegal. her husband, matt, is campaigning
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for a change in the law to bring cycling offences into line with those faced by drivers if they hit someone. we can talk about this with duncan dollimore, the road safety and legal campaigns officerfor cycling uk. bill chidley is a former bike courier who now writes a cycling blog. hello. hello. ok. so, how popular are these bikes without front brakes and why? it's a fashion thing. i mean, it's important to remember that in america where the kind of fashion for it is legal. so there was a blurring of perception i think, but it is a fashion thing. there is no reason to ride without a
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front brake. and you would agree with that? we have made it very, very clear that charlie alliston's actions was stupid and illegal and they endangered other people including himself. if it is the fashion thing, as bill says, what do you do about that? i think there needs to be some education about this. this hasn't been something that's been very much in the public eye. this has been a tragic case which has highlighted it and there needs to be awareness in relation to the risks that are involved. certainly, this seems to be a bit of a clique thing. it is not something that's massive outside of london. i think it is a flat commuter city trend. how did it come about that people rode without the front brake? you would have to ask them, yeah, you'd have to ask them. like i said, it's a fashion thing. basically the
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european saw the american couriers riding without front brakes and they we re riding without front brakes and they were like, "ah, that looks cool." i think the way to deal with this is by putting more traffic police out there. the way to deal with a lot of problems on the roads is by putting more traffic police out there. it is not, changing the law is in my opinion useless unless you put more police out there. it is like painting 20 on the road and expecting people to slow downment they won't unless there are more police out there enforcing. maoth hue briggs is calling for the change in law. where do you stand on that? the driving offences and motoring offe nces the driving offences and motoring offences need, are in urgent need of review. there is a public misconception that those that cause serious injury or death in a motor vehicle are severely dealt with by the court system. only 56% of people
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who were convicted of causing death by an offence in a motor vehicle in 2015 were sent to prison. in terms of people convicted of causing death by careless driving, only to of the 120 people convicted receive a sentence over two years. the judge has powers of imprisonment today for up has powers of imprisonment today for up to two years for the offence that charlie alliston faces. so the reality is, that there is an issue concerning how people are dealt with for irresponsible behaviour on the roads. the only difference that we have in terms of what matt briggs is calling for and where we are, we say you shouldn't address failing legislation by looking at a particular aspect of one road user. we need to have a full review of all the road traffic offences and ledge solution and how we deal with irresponsible behaviour on the road by everybody. bill, there is a sense among cyclists, particularly online, that they aren't protected enough when they're hit and you know,
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sometimes unfairly scapegoated when they hit someone? there is an element of scapegoating. if you look at the media coverage of charlie alliston, they did a number on him. the mail revealed details of something he kept hidden from the jury. he has been scapegoated. i know the guy comes across as very unlikable and isn't really showing very much remorse, but he is still just a kid. he is stilljust a kid who has been involved in a really, really u nfortu nate who has been involved in a really, really unfortunate accident. sorry, crash. thank you both. thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you. saturday night live wins big at the emmys in the age of the trump. i suppose i should say at long last
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mr president, here is your emmy. alec baldwin was among cast members to receive an award for his impression of the us president. borisjohnson and the head of the uk statistics authority have both refused to back down in their public row over brexit. his father says he's keeping the brexit flame bright. more from him shortly. with the news here's annita in the bbc newsroom. good morning. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. an 18—year—old was detained at dover. two men remain in custody. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson in a growing row
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over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting in an article that the uk stood to regain £350 million a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the "wilful distortion" of his article and asked him "to withdraw it." an investigation for this programme has found that animal welfare is being neglected on long journeys across europe amid a booming livestock trade. it's been discovered livestock hauliers have been routinely breaking eu laws for the protection of animals in transit. animal rights groups are calling for a ban on journeys of more than eight hours. there's been a sharp rise in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. the chief constable in charge of child abuse investigations across the uk has told the bbc that he will ‘consider‘ working with paedophile hunter groups in the future. that's a summary of the latest news,
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join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. .. gotan e—mail got an e—mail from got an e—mailfrom richard, an organic beef farmer in east sussex, and he says can you explain the reasons animal are moved is economic. if the uk paid what good quality meat is worth, animals would not go abroad, by british, make sure top quality produce a slaughtered and eaten at home, buy from your local farmers and eaten at home, buy from your localfarmers and and eaten at home, buy from your local farmers and support british farming so we can maintain the highest standards of animal welfare. we slaughter or animals locally, 20 minutes away, we sell within a 20 mile area, it can be done well and humanely if the customer demands it. thank you. tim is back with the latest sports headlines. ronald koeman says people need to be more realistic about where his side will finish this season, after manchester united boss jose mourinho said they should be aiming for at least the top four despite £140 million worth
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of new players over the summer, wayne rooney and co lost 4—0 against mourinho's men yesterday. united arejoint leaders of the premier league, while everton are third from bottom. lewis hamilton is getting closer to a fourth world title after he won the singapore grand prix yesterday, and his championship rivals sebastian vettel along with his ferrari teammate kimi raikkonen crashed out after a first corner collision. quite a crash it was too! and there was a surprise winner of the 2017 champions league of darts in cardiff, as mensur suljovic won his first major event by beating former world champion gary anderson 11—9. that's it from me victoria, i'll have more sport on the bbc news channel throughout the day. thank you. this news humming in, to do with wayne rooney, pleading guilty at stockport magistrates to a charge of drink—driving. justin, wayne rooney pleading guilty to a charge of drink—driving, appearing
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wayne rooney pleading guilty to a ch st now. iri~§§:/5551,gpear|ng wayne rooney pleading guilty to a a {5257+ ii; ;—1 ; li § wayne rooney pleading guilty to a 12525747 —: ; li§ wayne rooney pleading guilty to a a {5257+ li § wayne rooney pleading guilty to a ch st now. iri 55k -- that news just? next few minutes. —— that news just president trump getting the emmy awards he hoped for, bbc news beat siobhan garvin is here. saturday night live, the big tv show, a bit of satire and music and all the rest of satire and music and all the rest of it, alec baldwin has been playing donald trump in all the sketches, he picked up best supporting comedy actor last night and dedicated it to donald trump because, of course, before he was president he was on the apprentice, like our sir alan sugar and he never won an emmy for it and it always frustrated him. there was obviously a labour political references last night, probably the one getting the most
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pick—up is john spicer, probably the one getting the most pick—up isjohn spicer, but for press secretary, rohden on his lecturing and made reference to the fa ct lecturing and made reference to the fact this will be the most watched emmys ever which of course was talking about the inauguration, at least a sly dig at that. lots of people using their speeches and time on stage to make a reference to donald trump and the presidency. let's listen tojohn spicer. —— shone spicer. cheering this will be the largest audience to witness and emmys, period, both in person and around the world! mixed reaction to that, i think you'll find online. some people thinking it was funny, you said the reaction from the actors and actresses, melissa mccarthy who plays from the actors and actresses, melissa mccarthy who plastohn spicer and some people thinking it's too soon for him to be included in
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this fun celebration and actually, still a lot of questions to be answered. talk us through the winners, british tv did well. charlie brooker, the mastermind behind blackbird picked up best writing award. riz ahmed, who starred in the night off, game changerfor him, starred in the night off, game changer for him, in starred in the night off, game changerfor him, in america, confused, cannot believe what is going on, he was actually in on radio1 going on, he was actually in on radio 1 when he found out he got his emmy nomination, startled them, but probably not quite as he was there. fantastic heading an award from joseph fiennes. the big winners were the handmaid's tale and the little lies both strong female cast, nicole kidman picking up an award, elisabeth moss for the hand bit stale, the star of that, you can see. big little lies written and
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produced by females, reese witherspoon, used her speech to say because you have an all—female cast it doesn't mean men want watch at which has been a perception over the yea rs, which has been a perception over the years, too many women involved it will be very inclusive for women. —— handmaids tale. healing with issues like domestic violence, this sort of strange, dystopian future in the hand bit stale, slightly to close for comfort at the moment. those we re for comfort at the moment. those were the big winners, picking up 50 words each. thank you. wayne rooney pleading guilty to drink—driving, appearing at stop current magistrates‘ court, ollie foster is there. —— stockport. magistrates‘ court, ollie foster is there. -- stockport. there was a slight delay, he was due to be heard at10am, we slight delay, he was due to be heard at 10am, we understand he is in court number two, leading guilty to that charge of drink—driving, arrested and charged in the early
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hours of the 1st of september, a friday morning after spending much of the day in wilmslow, arrested just outside wilmslow driving a black volkswagen beetle belonging to a 29—year—old office worker laura simpson who was also in the vehicle. arrived here about 30 minutes before his hearing at the magistrates‘ court, flanked by a minder, his long—standing personal manager paul stretford and his lawyer and he is up stretford and his lawyer and he is up before the districtjudgejohn temporally, pleading guilty to that drink—driving charge. it carries a possible reason sentence of up to six months but this being his first offence of drink—driving, it‘s a minimum 12 month driving ban and an unlimited fine but wayne rooney, the evidence trucker, former england captain, former manchester united striker for 13 years pleading captain, former manchester united
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strikerfor 13 years pleading guilty to that charge. his club say they have dealt with the matter internally, his club manager ronald koeman says he is very disappointed but they have dealt with the matter, he has continued to play since that arrest two weeks ago, playing as recently as yesterday against his former club manchester united at old trafford. we wait for wayne rooney to leap year, possibly within the next 30—60 minutes after finding out what is punishment will be after pleading guilty. ollie foster, thank you. fentanyl is a powerful pain—relieving drug, more than 50 times more potent than heroin — according to the national crime agency. while it has been used in hospitals for decades as pain relief medication, an illegal version of the drug has been linked to thousands of deaths in the us in recent years — including that of prince — and it‘s now fast becoming a problem in the uk. different versions of the drug have been linked to at least 60 deaths here over the last 8 months. the drug is also the subject of a bbc 3 documentary as part of the ‘drugs map of britain‘ series.
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it‘s called ‘fentanyl: deadlier than heroin‘ and is available to watch on bbc three‘s iplayer channel now. here‘s a quick clip — and a warning — it contains a graphic scene of drug use. fentanyl is taking the opioid epidemic to a new level of urgency. america is in the midst of declaring a state of national emergency in response to their current opioid crisis. one of the key drivers of this is a powerful synthetic painkiller called fentanyl. the substance is now being linked to a recent spike in overdoses on uk soil. the majority of these cases have been found in yorkshire and the humber. we travelled to hull to meet those affected by this lethal drug. say on a scale of one to ten, heroin‘s a two and fentanyl‘s like an 11.
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it‘s like going from being slapped with a pillow to hit by a train, do you know what i mean? i reckon, i reckon we‘re just a small percentage of what it actually is. it‘ll be here, there and everywhere, it won‘tjust be a small amount here now and then it‘s gone. my dad passed away, my mam passed away. my nan and grandad, like, they left me, they moved to scarborough, so i‘ve been on my own since. why do you think they left? i don‘t know, to be honest, i was only a kid, i didn‘t really do much wrong. you‘re a kid and you‘ve got no rules. a lot of things what you shouldn‘t do or shouldn‘t have done, you start doing, do you know what i mean? don‘t know, just gets worse from there. the national crime agency says that
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60 people have died in the uk in the past eight months after taking the painkilling drug fe nta nyl. it's 50 times more potent than heroin and is the drug that was linked to the death of the rockstar prince... about six months ago i actually came across it, not looking for it and not realising, but i tried it and it blew my head off, to be fair. like i said, it‘sjust so strong, honestly, just really, really strong. quite recently a lot of people think it‘s gone for good and think they can‘t find it, but it‘s like, i know where it‘s coming from and i know where it is, and i know how to get it. not everyone does any more, but yeah, yeah, it‘s still there. i'm out of the game now. i had a lot of people asking for it. there's been more deaths since, this year alone, end
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of december up until now. so were people worried when they first came in? i don't think they was, i think they were more excited than owt. and what were they excited about? that it was stronger. those that were selling the fentanyl was doing a lot more business than the ones just selling the normal heroin. we can chat about fentanyl more now with tony saggers, who was the national crime agency‘s head of drugs threat and intelligence until earlier this year. and dr craig mckenzie, an expert in psychoactive substances from the university of dundee. he joins us from aberdeen. welcome, both of you, when you are at the nca, you were so worried about this you made a public statement, why? that's right, it was crucial to bring knowledge up to the drug addict user group and those who
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work around them to tell them about the dangers of this relatively new and emerging substance. daddy got a sense of how popular it is? i think popular is probably the wrong word although we‘ve just heard an example of how much more of an impact it has on the user than heroin on its own. for me, it‘s about an emerging situation, suppliers trying to introduce, to increase demand as opposed to users saying we want that and in the early days i was absolutely sure that those suffering the deaths and those using it on a daily basis did not even know they we re daily basis did not even know they were consuming fenta nyl, daily basis did not even know they were consuming fentanyl, it was not popular itself... sorry, fight our dealers adding sentinel to heroin? what is the motivation? two clear benefits, one to change the experience the addicts are having and therefore cornered the market to supply the drug that is doing it and the other is to allow you to make your heroin go further, you can dilate heroin, at the fentanyl and make the heroin feel like a stronger quality. doctor craig mackenzie,
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welcome, we have seen from the film the kind of damage it can cause but tell us about this would have devastating impact it‘s having in the state, for example? yes, in the states it's had a very devastating impact, round about 20,000 drug deaths have been linked to fentanyl and fe nta nyl related deaths have been linked to fentanyl and fentanyl related compounds. and so and fentanyl related compounds. and so that's obviously a massive impact but we also have to be aware that the context of that drug use may also be quite different in the united states to what we are seeing in the uk. sure. how is fentanyl getting into the uk? one of the routes is that you can buy or users and drugs gangs can actually i fe nta nyl and related compounds and drugs gangs can actually i fentanyl and related compounds from the dark web, the internet and has indications that a higher level bad as what may be happening. it's unlikely that will be a major source on the street but it may be that drugs gangs may be buying that end.
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0k, drugs gangs may be buying that end. ok, tony, if it‘s being bought on the dark net that makes it more difficult, does, poor organisations like the nca to stop it? the dark net is a parallel version of the open market and both difficult to infiltrate. what it does provide is an end to end communication platform which then has two exploit the poor soul situation, the postal service because the dark net does not have its own delivery capability on like people dealing face—to—face and did very much relies upon the parcels international, into the uk and the postal system to get those packages out of the users. this had an opportunity for the nca, and in? it's opportunity for the nca, and in? it‘s an opportunity for all and watson, borderforce, nca, police, arima chun on street issue. doctor mackenzie de you think we will see an increase in the use of fentanyl over the coming months? it is hard to say. what seems to have happened you have got one
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localised situation, you cannot predict how that may spread, vigilance has increased in laboratories who are testing seizures and in hospitals, and in postmortem samples so if something does arise, our ability to spot it and react to it is very fast. ok. thank you both. thank you very much. thank you both. thank you very much. thank you both. thank you very much. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you. the chairman of the uk statistics authority, sir david norgrove, says he stands by his criticism of the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, who he‘s accused of a clear misuse of officialfigures. sir david‘s intervention followed mrjohnson reasserting that the uk stood to regain control of around £350 million a week after brexit. the claim was made in an article mrjohnson had written setting out his own brexit bluepint. the home secretary, amber rudd, has accused mrjohnson of "back—seat driving". this is back seat driving.
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yeah, you could call it back seat driving, absolutely, but i am very clear that the cabinet and the government supports theresa may. that there is a difficult moment to make sure that we get the best result for the united kingdom, but i'm sure we can. some of his colleagues are suspicious of him. that article contradicts government policy. boris‘ father, the former conservative mep, stanley johnson, has told this programme he supports his son 100%. i thought it was absolutely right for a i thought it was absolutely right fora man i thought it was absolutely right for a man who has, you know, been in the fore front of the brexit campaign including, possibly, you know the man who helped push britain over into you know a very leave position lastjune, over into you know a very leave position last june, absolutely over into you know a very leave position lastjune, absolutely right that he should keep that flame bright and clear before people‘s eyes and ears. i say that... but why write it now? it is all the more
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important to write it now to make it clear that there is a vision out there, which, you know, people have held and do hold and by the way, particularly important to write it now because as you will absolutely remember last week in strasbourg the president of the european commission made what many could have seen as a kind of inflammatory, incendiary speech setting out a vision for the eu, a vision of everybody having the common sense, all sorts of things, all kinds of rules... the problem is, it makes it look like the cabinet is not united and you know that voters don‘t like governments that voters don‘t like governments that don‘t appear to be united? well, it is very nice of you to say so. well, it is very nice of you to say so. but at the moment we are at a fa ntastically so. but at the moment we are at a fantastically position, it is vital to get brexit right and the message with boris, i think put forward in his article in the newspaper, not
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only was it timely for reasons i just mentioned in terms of the counter vision which has been proposed in brussels, but timely also because it was clear it was precise and it was an absolutely designed to be an input, an input into this important speech there is may is going to make in florence this week. what conversations have you had with borisjohnson about his prime ministerial ambitions?m you had with borisjohnson about his prime ministerial ambitions? it is a ludicrous question. i‘m about as far as way as i could possibly be short of being in australia! i have read this article... what it was and what it said and i have, of course, absolutely ta ken on it said and i have, of course, absolutely taken on board, you know, theissue absolutely taken on board, you know, the issue and the statement... sure. i‘m simply asking you, between father and son, what conversations have you had with your son about your son‘s prime ministerial am bishings? good heaven's, father and sons conversations are covered by
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what is end to end inappropriate and i won‘t talk about that thing on air. but you have had this them clearly. hold on. hold on. i noticed some people have said when attacking boris they say, "even his family don‘t support him." let‘s put that to rest. even though you was a leading remain campaigner. we are where we are. i support where we are. i support what bar ris is doing andi are. i support what bar ris is doing and i want to make it clear that this member of the johnson and i want to make it clear that this member of thejohnson family is behind him. do you support his ambitions to become leader of the conservative party and potentially one day prime minister?” conservative party and potentially one day prime minister? i have no idea what his ambitions are. i honestly can tell you that. do you genuinely believe people will believe that? his ambition maybe too write about shakespeare. he has done a brilliant one of churchill or it might be to paint a fantastic set of
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muralsful i won‘t presume about any of my children‘s ambition. they will do their own thing. do you think he maybe miffed that jacobries mogg has overta ken maybe miffed that jacobries mogg has overtaken him to be the next tory party leader? i tell you what, overtaken him to be the next tory party leader? itell you what, i happen to have read a fabulous article by jacobries mogg happen to have read a fabulous article byjacobries mogg in support of boris so i‘m 100% sure that boris is going to be delighted to have jacobries mogg‘s support and i think roll on, this was a brilliant article. it wasn‘t a mogg—a—don article. it wasn‘t a mogg—a—don article. boris is pleased to have that support. so he doesn't see jacobries mogg as a rival for the tory party leadership? you are trying to put me into that camp. we are at the moment looking forward to the tory party conference. we are looking forward o to getting brexit
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right and honestly what i have read in the newspapers, many, many newspapers, and i haven‘t read them all, but i‘ve read some of them from here, is that there has been, i think, a very bad reaction to the kind of tone of boris‘ article. that seems to me the important point. will borisjohnson seems to me the important point. will boris johnson care seems to me the important point. will borisjohnson care that the head of the uk statistics authority has said he is disappointed and surprised that that 350 million vote leave figure has been revisited and said it was a clear misuse of official stats? well, anybody, i love that coming from the head of the uk statistics authority when i think of all the data the treasury put out in the run—up to the referendum of employment to rising and economic growth falling off, i laugh a bit, but let‘s talk about the issue. frankly they are quibbling over peanuts, it is two bald men fighting over a comb!
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wayne rooney has been banned for driving for two years. he pleaded guilty this morning at stockport magistrates to drink—driving. olly foster ca n magistrates to drink—driving. olly foster can tell us more. hi olly. yes, victoria, wayne rooney is still inside stockport magistrates. it happened quickly. there was a slight delay, but wayne rooney pleaded guilty to the charge of drink—driving after he was arrested in the early hours on 1st september nearly wilmslow driving a black volkswagen beetle belonging to laura simpson. he came flanked by his long—standing minder and his manager. he pleaded guilty and just the details of his punishment coming through from the districtjudge who he was before. he received 100 hours
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community order in the next 12 months of unpaid work and also a two year driving ban. that‘s a community order was reduced from 150 hours because of the guilty pleament we are waiting to find out what the actual fine will be which we presume will be a large fine for wayne rooney. i am will be a large fine for wayne rooney. iam not will be a large fine for wayne rooney. i am not sure if we have details of that. we are waiting to find out what the fine will be. yes, pleading guilty to that charge of drink—driving. pleading guilty to that charge of drink-driving. ok. thank you very much. norman smith is our political guru. this famous 350 million figure that boris johnson guru. this famous 350 million figure that borisjohnson talked about taking control of in this article, the bbc has been reality checking it. tell us more? well, the 350 million figure is the gross figure which we notionally give to the eu, but which in the real world, we
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don‘t actually give to the eu because it doesn‘t take into account the money we get back from the eu for the rebate negotiating by mrs thatcher roughly about 100 million. so in terms of cash sent over to brussels land we only send £250 million in the real world. on top of that, we get money back from the eu for more deprived parts of the uk, wales, cornwall, about 80 million comes back in regionalfunding and we get another 20 million back for university research and business research. so the amount of cash if you like, that we give is probably around about 150 to 200 million which is why mrjohnson has shifted his argument, not talking about money spent or money saved, but about taking control of our commitment to the eu, but you know, it‘s a figure which pretty much no one else uses except mrjohnson. thank you. you know borisjohnson well. why is
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he so desperate to be prime minister? i don't think he is desperate to be prime minister. boris was at the head of a very successful referendum campaign which was based on a positive notion of brexit and the opportunities it give us brexit and the opportunities it give us this country for the future. i think that what is driving this is a sense of frustration that positive story isn‘t being got out there. there is too much gloom around and boris thought it was a time to put the positive story out there because it is part of his legacy. i don‘t think it is to do with leadership. is that naive to say it is nothing to do with leadership. what do you say? most of my constituents are interested in the news about wayne rooney. this is the foreign secretary undermining the prime minister. it is a reminder that the
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tory approach is a race to the bottom on brexit which will see us being a tax haven based on low skills and low wages and frankly this 350 million figure is a fantasy and the conservatives need to come clean about what their plans are for the nhs otherwise they are misleading the public. a brief word. the labour party has been all over the shop on what sort of britain it wa nts to the shop on what sort of britain it wants to see after brexit as well. i think it would be good if they gave their statement, 4,000 words in the papers as to what they want to see happen with the country too, but i applaud boris for doing this, because it gives a vision that a lot of people feel they are support and a lot of people feel it has been a negative campaign and even the government hasn‘t stepped up in the sort of positive way that we would like to see. we would like to believe the government has a positive view for britain after we leave the european union. is he not undermining the prime minister? well, you will see on friday when she makes her speech. it is radically different from boris said.
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i don‘t think at the moment there is any evidence that on any item of substance tone is maybe a different matter, but that they disagree. thank you for your company today. on the programme tomorrow, we‘ll be joined by the brownlee brothers — jonny and alistair tell us about their triathalon success. have a good day. good morning. a cool feel to the weather today. we have some sunshine, but also a risk of some showers. there is plenty of brea ks of some showers. there is plenty of breaks and much of the showers across eastern counties and there area across eastern counties and there are a few rolling in to wales. where we have the showers, it is blustery. despite the sunshine, it is feeling cool today with the temperatures ranging between 11 to 18 celsius. through tonight, the showers will continue to trickle southwards,
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clearing. overnight, underneath the clearing. overnight, underneath the clear skies and the light winds we will see mist and fog forming and the potential for frost to form across scotland with temperatures between seven to ten celsius. tomorrow, with high pressure building, we can look forward to a settled day. it will feel warmer. a lot of dry and bright weather to look forward, but we will start to see the cloud increasing across northern ireland as we head into the afternoon. in the sunshine feeling warm with the temperatures up to about 19 celsius.
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